A colour palette generator tool I built.

I’ve been working on it off and on (mostly off) for the past 8 months, and I’m happy to finally get this version of it out the door.

I hope you find it useful.

"For Google, devices are dumb glass and the intelligence is in the cloud, but for Apple the cloud is just dumb storage and the device is the place for intelligence."

I’ve been working through [Orchestrate’s Node.js tutorial](http://orchestrate.io/blog/2014/04/02/build-node-js-apps-in-five-quick-steps-on-orchestrate], after running bowery connect and save a chance I kept running the same error. It looks like:

lstat .subla6b.tmp: no such file or directory

I’ve done a little digging and, as the filename implies, Sublime Text is doing somethingbehind the scenes that I wasn’t aware of. That something is atomic saves. You can see some arguments for and against it on this thread on Sublime Text’s forum

What I really needed to know is on this StackOverflow Question. In the end, all I really need to do is add:

"atomic_save": false

…to my preferences, I restarted sublime for good measure, and now bowery is good to go.

I’m calling that out because I’m glad to hear things have been turning around at Sport Ngin.

Beyond that, I simply wanted to re-iterate this in terms of my own framework. By translating “Bullshit” to “Noise” and considering compensation as a signal, I arrived at this equation:

RetentionProbability = Signal:Noise

The better the ratio, the greater the probability of keeping someone around.

This is really only of value to me, but this is what my text editor looks like right now.

Not only the noun, but the word itself.

A couple years back in my professional career I came upon the philosophy of “walking the path of least bullshit.” It was a good reminder to myself that when I got caught up in useless stuff—fears, opinions, distractions—that I should eliminate them and get to the goal.

However, vulgarity is vulgar because it’s not subtle. So not long ago I asked myself what I really meant when I said “bullshit” in that context and discovered the answer was noise.

Nirvana, a word that represents a state of ultimate peace, can translate direction into English as silence. Therefore, what I’m really saying to myself is that in order to achieve a peaceful working environment I ought to eliminate the noise.

Sometimes a little bullshit is tolerable in the early stages of a project when I’m attempting to figure out exactly what it is that I’m trying to build, but there comes a point when the essence of the goal has been distilled and it’s time to get to work making what matters. At that point noise is intolerable, only signal will suffice.

Ergo, I Walk The Path of Least Noise.

Ms. Sore Demon,

I insincerely regret that my use of a metaphor, that being the flushing of fecal matter down a toilet to describe the act of removing bits of information from a code base that are no longer useful, was so ostentatious that you felt it necessary to attack my words in such a barely intelligible manner.

I’m attempting to surmise from your rant that you’re a programmer as well, though of a gender other than male, offended and potentially violated, to such a degree that I witnessed a display of rage directed at words I wrote that effectively agreed with another author’s original intent.

Therefore, I’m going to grant you amnesty regarding your situation and invite you to partake in a pleasant duel of wit. If you would be so kind as to provide a decent metaphor to replace mine I would be ever so gracious to receive it.

Sincerely, This Idiot.

soredemonao:

mrdarcymurphy:

So, DHH has seen the light or something. Great. Good for him.

I’d like to take the opportunity to say that TDD is a philosophy. While it’s practically restricted to the realm of software development, it is, like all philosophies, absurd.

And it’s not really the philosophy that’s the problem, it’s the Dogma. TDD, in my eyes, has always been an illusion. I’ve found it impossible to figure out what to test or how to test it until I’ve actually written some code and used the thing in the first place. In the community’s parlance that’s a “spike.” Some in the writing community would call it a shitty first draft. It’s very valuable—you made something real—though it’s not very reliable.

To this day I still find tremendous value in having thorough unit tests though. They’ve saved my butt in the past and I’m confident they will again. They’re a signal in an otherwise noisy software development environment, both digitally and physically.

My philosophy is to Walk the Path of Least Noise. Which is where DHH and I agree. If your tests are a noisy nuisance, violating an otherwise mellow software development environment, then flush that shit and move on.






I get where you’re going with your rude little analogy but philosophy doesn’t transfer well into code. (Neither do relationships)  *Philosophy requires human beings and it’s likened to comparing Einstein and Newton’s laws to stupid shit like love. (On the one side, you have a poet thinking they’re clever, and on the other you end up with a bunch of insulted and annoyed physicists.) 


It still comes down to a matter of knowing enough what not to test. That being said. If you prefer a less noisy environment? What do you do to antagonize out that response?

You cause the problems that create the noise   … Right?

So who’s the asshole in your little analogy now? 

Hint: The person doing the testing. 

What’s the cost to prevent a bug? 

Same as the cost of your integrity, your respect and your image when some asshole with a propensity toward fucking with people just to see how much they’ll complain, does so to someone smart enough to realize what shit they’re trying to pull, but trusting enough to maybe hope they’ll know better?

Bullshit: Validates presence of What?

How do you figure out what’s worth testing without making noise? 

It’s a catch 22.

The programmer is always ultimately causing and creating his own test, and therefore causing all the “noise” 

I say  … get rid of the “programmer” and buy a fucking vibrator.

Yes?

*And don’t deny your little analogy, or I’ll just ignore you and delete you.

And the moral of the story kiddies is this: Don’t cause problems just to see what happens and then blame the noise you get on the program. 

It’s you   … It’s all you! 

*I hate people. This is a demonstration of why. Because they think that you’re not smart enough to get what they’re saying, that they can say it less the noise… that it earned, merited and respectfully for all intents and purposes…

you deserve for objectifying women like a gross disgusting pig … in a code metaphor. 

You know you did  … shadd’up! 

And smart women aren’t always quiet. I’m a noisy bitch surrounded by sneaky back door idiots. 

So I’m fucking noisy! 

…So there’s that. 

Sigh.

You’re confused.

And angry.

I get that.

I doubt you’ll believe this, but I can sympathize with what you’re trying to get out. But I won’t tolerate your abuse.

Please, do yourself a favour, take everything you’ve just said about me, reflect and realize it’s actually about you, and take you own blog title’s advice.

Because what I just read from you was an unintelligible rant from someone who’s apparently offended because I agreed with a guy in a roundabout way.

Cheers, man.

So, DHH has seen the light or something. Great. Good for him.

I’d like to take the opportunity to say that TDD is a philosophy. While it’s practically restricted to the realm of software development, it is, like all philosophies, absurd.

And it’s not really the philosophy that’s the problem, it’s the Dogma. TDD, in my eyes, has always been an illusion. I’ve found it impossible to figure out what to test or how to test it until I’ve actually written some code and used the thing in the first place. In the community’s parlance that’s a “spike.” Some in the writing community would call it a shitty first draft. It’s very valuable—you made something real—though it’s not very reliable.

To this day I still find tremendous value in having thorough unit tests though. They’ve saved my butt in the past and I’m confident they will again. They’re a signal in an otherwise noisy software development environment, both digitally and physically.

My philosophy is to Walk the Path of Least Noise. Which is where DHH and I agree. If your tests are a noisy nuisance, violating an otherwise mellow software development environment, then flush that shit and move on.

From now on, my default answer to anything will be “I’ll think about it.”