Ms. Sore Demon,

I insincerely regret that my use of a metaphor, that being the flushing of fecal matter down a toilet to describe the act of removing bits of information from a code base that are no longer useful, was so ostentatious that you felt it necessary to attack my words in such a barely intelligible manner.

I’m attempting to surmise from your rant that you’re a programmer as well, though of a gender other than male, offended and potentially violated, to such a degree that I witnessed a display of rage directed at words I wrote that effectively agreed with another author’s original intent.

Therefore, I’m going to grant you amnesty regarding your situation and invite you to partake in a pleasant duel of wit. If you would be so kind as to provide a decent metaphor to replace mine I would be ever so gracious to receive it.

Sincerely, This Idiot.

soredemonao:

mrdarcymurphy:

So, DHH has seen the light or something. Great. Good for him.

I’d like to take the opportunity to say that TDD is a philosophy. While it’s practically restricted to the realm of software development, it is, like all philosophies, absurd.

And it’s not really the philosophy that’s the problem, it’s the Dogma. TDD, in my eyes, has always been an illusion. I’ve found it impossible to figure out what to test or how to test it until I’ve actually written some code and used the thing in the first place. In the community’s parlance that’s a “spike.” Some in the writing community would call it a shitty first draft. It’s very valuable—you made something real—though it’s not very reliable.

To this day I still find tremendous value in having thorough unit tests though. They’ve saved my butt in the past and I’m confident they will again. They’re a signal in an otherwise noisy software development environment, both digitally and physically.

My philosophy is to Walk the Path of Least Noise. Which is where DHH and I agree. If your tests are a noisy nuisance, violating an otherwise mellow software development environment, then flush that shit and move on.






I get where you’re going with your rude little analogy but philosophy doesn’t transfer well into code. (Neither do relationships)  *Philosophy requires human beings and it’s likened to comparing Einstein and Newton’s laws to stupid shit like love. (On the one side, you have a poet thinking they’re clever, and on the other you end up with a bunch of insulted and annoyed physicists.) 


It still comes down to a matter of knowing enough what not to test. That being said. If you prefer a less noisy environment? What do you do to antagonize out that response?

You cause the problems that create the noise   … Right?

So who’s the asshole in your little analogy now? 

Hint: The person doing the testing. 

What’s the cost to prevent a bug? 

Same as the cost of your integrity, your respect and your image when some asshole with a propensity toward fucking with people just to see how much they’ll complain, does so to someone smart enough to realize what shit they’re trying to pull, but trusting enough to maybe hope they’ll know better?

Bullshit: Validates presence of What?

How do you figure out what’s worth testing without making noise? 

It’s a catch 22.

The programmer is always ultimately causing and creating his own test, and therefore causing all the “noise” 

I say  … get rid of the “programmer” and buy a fucking vibrator.

Yes?

*And don’t deny your little analogy, or I’ll just ignore you and delete you.

And the moral of the story kiddies is this: Don’t cause problems just to see what happens and then blame the noise you get on the program. 

It’s you   … It’s all you! 

*I hate people. This is a demonstration of why. Because they think that you’re not smart enough to get what they’re saying, that they can say it less the noise… that it earned, merited and respectfully for all intents and purposes…

you deserve for objectifying women like a gross disgusting pig … in a code metaphor. 

You know you did  … shadd’up! 

And smart women aren’t always quiet. I’m a noisy bitch surrounded by sneaky back door idiots. 

So I’m fucking noisy! 

…So there’s that. 

Sigh.

You’re confused.

And angry.

I get that.

I doubt you’ll believe this, but I can sympathize with what you’re trying to get out. But I won’t tolerate your abuse.

Please, do yourself a favour, take everything you’ve just said about me, reflect and realize it’s actually about you, and take you own blog title’s advice.

Because what I just read from you was an unintelligible rant from someone who’s apparently offended because I agreed with a guy in a roundabout way.

Cheers, man.

So, DHH has seen the light or something. Great. Good for him.

I’d like to take the opportunity to say that TDD is a philosophy. While it’s practically restricted to the realm of software development, it is, like all philosophies, absurd.

And it’s not really the philosophy that’s the problem, it’s the Dogma. TDD, in my eyes, has always been an illusion. I’ve found it impossible to figure out what to test or how to test it until I’ve actually written some code and used the thing in the first place. In the community’s parlance that’s a “spike.” Some in the writing community would call it a shitty first draft. It’s very valuable—you made something real—though it’s not very reliable.

To this day I still find tremendous value in having thorough unit tests though. They’ve saved my butt in the past and I’m confident they will again. They’re a signal in an otherwise noisy software development environment, both digitally and physically.

My philosophy is to Walk the Path of Least Noise. Which is where DHH and I agree. If your tests are a noisy nuisance, violating an otherwise mellow software development environment, then flush that shit and move on.

From now on, my default answer to anything will be “I’ll think about it.”

"Postmodernity then represents the culmination of this process where constant change has become the status quo and the notion of progress obsolete."

I do my best work when I have clear directions and an absolute lack of interruptions. All other work is about attaining that environment.

“All other work” almost entirely involves listening to other people, sprinkled with occasional questions.

I’ve also found it to be vital to treat myself with the same respect. Self reflection leads to health and happiness.

If you’re wondering, this is the book that helped me figure out I have ADD. Except I didn’t read it, couldn’t do it. My wife did. She had a “holy shit” moment when reading over the symptoms of the hypoactive aspects of the disorder.

At first I honestly didn’t believe her and had an excuse for every symptom she read off. But as time went by, we kept thinking, and she helped me write a list of things from my and my family’s history. I took that to my doctor, who was quite understanding, and that was that.

My favourite part of my conversation with him went like this:

"And I can’t even get anything done unless I’ve got my headphones on and I’m listening to music." I said.

"What kind?"

"Oh, the heavier the better."

He nodded. “Yup, me too.”

Since then, I’ve noticed there’s a lot of people out there who share the disorder. Though I think many have no idea.

If you’re curious, give the book a shot.

(oh, and no there’s not fucking affiliate link…Minnesota tax laws killed that dead).

Fads, trends, and the winds of change are precisely why I believe it’s important to stand for what I believe in.

I was diagnosed last year.

Unlike my kids, who’re the hyperactive type literally bouncing off the walls, I’m the hypoactive kind. Some days, I can’t fucking move.

If you saw me popping pills at work, that was Adderall. The brain converts amphetamines to dopamine, which counters the root chemical problem of ADD, an under-production of dopamine in the brain.

Here’s the kicker: for me, it’s not genetic.

I developed ADD as a result of child abuse. Which, as I understand it, means that I was so heavily abused by my parents that my brain’s ability to produce happy juice was impaired to the point I developed a mental disorder.

By time I entered my late teens the best I could do most days was lie on my bed, effectively catatonic from PTSD, listening to heaviest music I could find, waiting for the next barrage to hit.

As a result, the only thing that actually pumped up my brain with dopamine was anger. Just about every day at work I’d swear at and curse whatever I was working on, then knock out some code, finally feeling triumphant by the end of the day. The times I couldn’t were horrific torture. I’m not proud, but that’s how it went. Either I got angry or I couldn’t fucking move.

Look at me, talking about it like it’s the past or something. ha ha ha. (grumble)

Similarly, the music I enjoy is harder than most people can tolerate, yet I’d be completely calm while it’s blasting. That’s because it’s a passive form of dopamine production. It doesn’t require me to get (as) angry. The music alone can sometimes invigorate me enough to function.

This is all based on my experiences and almost completely uneducated medical opinion, so please do take it with a grain of salt. But two out of two doctors concur.

So, there you go. That’s my secret. I was so abused as a child I developed a mental disorder. Fuck yeah.

The Amazon Fire TV comes with game support out of the box. That seems important to me and smart. It’s a genuinely important competitive advantage, and they’ll have at least one hit, Minecraft, available for it day one.

But, excepting the Wii Fit, I know of no video game peripheral that ever sold well, and I expect the Fire TV’s game controller to follow suit. In order to succeed, the peripheral typically had to ship with the console or it wasn’t recognized by customers as being available, and of those that were aware it was a hard sell. Buy the peripheral, or another game?

Though, I think Amazon is doing the right thing by selling the console without a controller. But I imagine that’s only for the initial launch because adding one in would put the price over $100, and I think that’d be too far above its competitors’ devices.

If the system takes off, and the controller and games sell well enough, I wouldn’t be surprised to see Amazon release a “Gamer’s Edition” that bundles a controller or two (two, please, because nobody has done that since the SNES), and a game or three for under $200.

Whatever happens, the gap between a console and a computer just got bridged.